Skip to Main

Clinical and Health Information Sciences

  • CAHS Welcomes President Pinto!

    by Kaitlyn Maxwell | Jan 12, 2017

     

    Welcome President Pinto

    President Pinto

     The University of Cincinnati (UC) will welcome it’s 30th president in February 2017. Neville Pinto, PhD was named UC’s next president on December 17th by the UC Board of Trustees.

    Currently, President-Elect Pinto, is serving as the acting president and professor of chemical engineering at the University of Louisville. Pinto has a long history with UC and many are excited for his return.

    Pinto served for 26 years on UC’s faculty in chemical engineering.  During this time, he held numerous administrative roles including Department Head for Chemical Engineering, Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies in the College of Engineering, and, most recently, Vice Provost and Dean of The Graduate School.

    In 2011, Pinto left UC and joined the University of Louisville as the Dean of the J.B. Speed School of Engineering. In 2015, he was named Interim Provost and most recently he is serving as the universities’ acting president.

    The search for UC’s president started in August after former President Santa Ono, PhD, left UC to become the President and Vice Chancellor of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.  

    College of Allied Health Sciences Dean, Tina Whalen, EdD, was one of the members of the presidential search committee that had a hand in choosing our 30th president.

    The university has a specific composition that makes up a presidential search committee (as outlined in University Rule 3361:10-6-01). A full list of search committee members can be found at the bottom of this article. As the Chairman of the Dean’s Council it made sense that Whalen would represent the university deans on the search. 

    Prior to beginning the search, the committee held sessions across the university to collect feedback about what stakeholders wanted in their next president. Based off of these conversations the committee knew that they couldn’t replicate former President Santa Ono, but they needed to find a candidate that was in touch with students. These sessions also made it clear that faculty and students wanted a president who ascribed by the values of the institution and who would not see UC as a stepping stone opportunity.

    After reviewing and interviewing the pool of candidates the committee recommended four finalists who then had further interviews with a number of stakeholder representatives. The final decision was solely with the Board of Trustees.

    “We were committed to getting the best possible candidate” Whalen said about the presidential search committee. To ensure that the committee had the highest quality pool they also had to protect the antinomy of the candidates for as long as they could. 

    “President Pinto offered the best of both worlds” says Whalen. “He has a history and knowledge of the university and has developed new experiences and skills while at the University of Louisville.”

    It was also important to the committee that Pinto made it clear that he wanted to come back to Cincinnati. “He intends to come here and establish himself in the university and the community” says Whalen.

    During his past years at UC, Pinto showed he was an advocate for the College of Allied Health Sciences and the Academic Health Center. 

    While he was dean of the graduate school, he worked with CAHS on a number of programs including:

    • Approving the doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program, a program that will surpass 200 graduates this year.
    • Moving the genetic counseling from CAHS to the College of Medicine. He was able to save the program by finding it another home, showing that he put students at the forefront of his decisions.
    • Supporting early conversations about the development of our Master of Occupational Therapy program which is currently in the final stages of accreditation.

    Whalen says she excited about Pinto’s arrival. “He is thoughtful, a good listener and very process-oriented when it comes to decision making” she says.  She also notes that she has received unsolicited messages from past and present faculty at the university who share in her excitement. Many of them say they have had positive interactions with Pinto over the years and thank the committee for their time during the search.

    As UC approaches its Bicentennial year, it now has a leader that can help take our rising institution to new heights. The campus is eager to see what 2017 with President Pinto will bring.

    Search Committee Members

    Rob Richardson, chair of the Board of Trustees and chair of the presidential search committee

    Shakila Ahmad, UC Foundation Board of Trustees
    C. Francis Barrett, Past Chairman, UC Board of Trustees
    Thomas D. Cassady, UC Board of Trustees
    Phil D. Collins, UC Board of Trustees
    Thomas H. Humes, Past Chairman, UC Board of Trustees
    Ericka King-Betts, Community Member
    Richard P. Lofgren, President and CEO, UC Health
    W. Troy Neat, UC Alumni Association
    Mitchell A. Phelps, Undergraduate Student Government
    Robert Probst, Dean, College of Design, Architecture, Art & Planning
    Sid Thatham, Graduate Student Government, Vice President
    Tina F. Whalen, Dean, College of Allied Health Sciences
    Faculty Member, elected by Faculty Senate
    Faculty Member, elected by Faculty Senate
    Ohio Department of Higher Education Designee, Gary Cates, Vice Chancellor for the Ohio Board of Regents

    Watch an interview with President Pinto here: http://www.uc.edu/president30.html

  • Focus on Students: Abeer Shehada

    by Kaitlyn Maxwell | Dec 08, 2016

    Focus on Students: Abeer Shehada

    Health Informatics student A conversation with Abeer Shehada, a 2016 graduate of UC’s online health informatics program. Shehada is getting a degree from the University of Cincinnati but lives in Qatar. 

    Q: How was your experience completing the degree while in a different country? 

    A: “It was definitely a learning curve when it came to understanding the healthcare system in the United States. However, learning the healthcare system of another country was enlightening in the sense that it allowed me to reflect on the health care systems I was familiar with in Canada and in Qatar. Completing the degree while residing in Qatar allowed me to apply and compare what I was learning to a different type of environment which was enriching. Overall, I didn't feel being in a different country hindered my learning or reduced my experience, but instead it allowed me to concurrently take what I was learning and apply it to different scenarios.” 

    Q: How different are the health IT issues in Qatar from those in the US? What are 3-5 key differences? 

    A: “Health IT is expanding in the region with international guidelines and best practices being followed. As health IT is new, the issues faced and the stages of progression are different to that of the US. For example, mandates such as meaningful use are not required and the stages of interopera-bility and data sharing are starting to develop. Also, since most of the health IT vendors are US based, much of the out of the box content follows US requirements and guidelines, which are not always applicable to the region and health system's workflows.” 

    Q: How do you see a MHI degree benefiting other professionals from allied health professions? 

    A: “As a dietitian and a clinical informaticist responsible for the implementation of allied health electronic documentation, the MHI degree definitely provided me with a better understanding of how electronic tools can be utilized to optimize the use of electronic documentation and workflows for allied health professionals. The documentation completed by allied health professionals are very comprehensive and logical data flow in the EHR becomes very important. Also, if more allied health professionals become more aware and involved in health informatics they will definitely help fill a gap that is currently present in the health informatics field as there is a primary focus on physicians and nursing needs with limited tools addressed to allied health professionals. The more allied health professionals enter the field of health informatics, the more awareness can be raised around the importance of including allied health needs in all aspects of informatics.” 

    Q: Can you summarize your practicum project? 

    A: “The availability of an interdisciplinary EHR system is not frequently available, especially not without a lot of customization done by the organization. The project will focus on exploring how disparate documentation of allied health professionals can be leveraged to improve the quality of patient care. Often, EHR implementations provide a large focus on nursing, physician and ancillary department’s EHR requirements and integration. This does not factor in the allied health professionals such as dietitians, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, etc. Therefore, the focus of the project is to provide recommendations on how to improve the documentation workflow and data flow for allied health professionals through the use of data dictionaries and setting up a data governance structure. The project aims to raise awareness to the allied health professionals in the health informatics field while proposing a standardization initiative for allied health documentation.” 

     

  • Medical Laboratory Science alumna finds success

    by Kaitlyn Maxwell | Nov 14, 2016

    Medical Laboratory Science alum finds success 

    The Pathways for Emerging Healthcare Leaders is a program for the Academic Health Center, which breaks down barriers that prevent high school students from pursuing careers in health care. This effort is part of a grant, funded by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health (OMH), which aims to increase diversity and cultural competence in the health care workforce so that the makeup of health care providers matches the general population. The program recently shared success stories from across the Academic Health Center in order to inspire future healthcare practitioners.  Alumna Cecelia Thompson, A&S ’09, CAHS ’11 of the medical laboratory science program was featured as one of their success stories.

  • Advanced Medical Imaging Technology graduate has acting/modeling past

    by Kaitlyn Maxwell | Aug 01, 2016

    Actress/Model completes new dream of an Advanced Medical Imaging Technology degree

    AMIT Student, Sharita Bone

    Sharita Bone, a 2016 graduate of UC’s Advanced Medical Imaging Technology (AMIT) program, is no stranger to the camera. While working in the corporate world, she modeled on and off and began acting about 7 years ago.  You’ll even spot Sharita as an extra in popular movies like The Avengers, Draft Day, Criminal Activities, and Captain America: The Winter Soldier. 

    Her 19 years in corporate America had begun to cause her to feel "burnt out" and wondering what her next journey would be. Sharita knew she still hadn’t quite found her calling.  “For months I went through a mental “what if” obstacle course, trying to decide what to do and when to do it” says Sharita.  

    After visiting the University of Cincinnati’s website, she knew where she wanted to go next.  The idea of starting over was daunting but she felt drawn to Advanced Medical Imaging Technology. “The idea of working with radiation held a certain appeal to me. What can I say? I love isotopes” says Sharita. Cancer and radiation therapy had also taken its toll on her family, so helping people was a big motivational factor in her career change. 

    Now Sharita is using images in an entirely new way as a graduate of the advanced medical imaging technology program. The program allows students to sit for board exams in two imaging modalities: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT).  There are more similarities in imaging and acting/modeling than you think she says. Being professional is key in both careers.

    Her professors have seen first hand that Sharita has the professionalism that it takes to have a successful career in AMIT. “She has been the de facto leader of her cohort and she understands clearly the mindset of a professional” says Alan Vespie, director of the Advanced Medical Technology program. 

    Sharita has represented the program at numerous research conferences and events. One of her favorite memories was presenting her research poster entitled, “Primary progressive multiple sclerosis and MRI: The disease, diagnosis, treatment, and research” in Singapore at the Section for Magnetic Resonance Technologists (SMRT) of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) annual meeting.

    AMIT student

    The field of Radiology has taken also note of her perseverance, maturity and passion for the field.  Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) awarded Sharita with the Jean Turner Minority Scholarship for Radiologic Technology in 2014. Shortly after that the American Society of Radiologic Technologists awarded named her one of only five students to receive the  $4,000 Royce Osborne Minority Student Scholarship.

    “The scholarships took a huge amount of stress off my shoulders” says Sharita. “My tuition, books and scrubs became more manageable costs, and the peace of mind it provided was invaluable.”

    To other minority students considering a career in AMIT, Sharita would say “What’s stopping you, do it now!” There are resources and mentors out there that will help you along the way.

    Sharita will graduate with the rest of her 2016 AMIT class on Saturday August 6th at 9:30 a.m. Graduates of the AMIT always graduate during the summer commencement due to their clinical rotation schedule.

    Her plans after graduation include finding a career in challenging and exciting field of research. Which yes, is a career change from her modeling/acting roots, but by following her passions and love of isotopes she is sure to have a long a successful career in the field. 

     

     

  • Carney Sotto, PhD, receives Sarah Grant Barber Outstanding Faculty Advisor award

    by Kaitlyn Maxwell | May 31, 2016

    First-year experience director receives prestigious faculty advisor award

    Carney Sotto

    Affectionately known as “caring mama bear” who “champions for students of all backgrounds” by her students, Carney Sotto, PhD, has been mentoring students in the College of Allied Health Sciences for nearly 20 years.  Her mentorship was recognized by the university this month, as she was announced as the 2016 recipient of the Sarah Grant Barber Outstanding Faculty Advisor award.

    "I feel extremely humbled and honored as the recipient of the Sarah Grant Barber Award" says Sotto. "Students are the reason we all have our jobs at the University of Cincinnati, so I am appreciative for every student who I have been in contact with. I absolutely love my job and couldn’t think of a better award than this to recognize my dedication toward students."

    The Office of Advising and Academic Services and UC Undergraduate Academic Advising Association (UCUAADA) give this annual award to one professional advisor, one faculty advisor and one advising administrator who showcase excellence in student mentorship. Students participate in the nomination process for the award.

    Sotto serves as the College of Allied Health Sciences’ (CAHS) first-year experience director as well as the undergraduate program director of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD), a program that has on average around 200 students. On top of these two major roles she finds time to write nearly 50 letters of recommendation each year and advise two different student organizations; the two-time national chapter of the year, National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA), and Multi-Cultural Concerns in CSD, which she co-founded. 

    Despite her busy schedule, she “never stops thinking about how to serve her students” says current master’s in speech-language-pathology student, Lexi Perrault. "She is really committed to ensuring the success of every student who walks through her door.”

    In addition to being a great faculty mentor she is also a role model to students. She is the past-president of the Ohio Speech-Language-Hearing Association and is very well connected to the profession. “Through her leadership, work, and interactions with students we see how passionate she is about the field of speech-language pathology, and that motivates us in the classroom” says recent CSD graduate Sarah Colligan.

    Associate Dean Chalee Engelhard says that CAHS is lucky to have Sotto advocating for students in the college. “Through all of her hard work, she is truly deserving of this award. We are very excited for her to receive the prestigious Sarah Grant Barber Faculty Advising award.”

    Learn more about the Sarah Grant Barber Award here

     

Clinical and Health Information Sciences wordle

Contact Us

College of Allied Health Sciences
French East Building
3202 Eden Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45267 

Phone: 513-558-7495
Fax: 513-558-7494
Email: cahs@uc.edu

Back to top